Feeding Your Athlete

20 Aug

Around here, morning PT is mandatory. Our husbands and wives are up at 0400 (that’s oh-dark-hundred, in case you’re wondering – WAY too early for civilized human beings to be conscious!) running, doing calisthenics, and getting ready for their day. We’re told that once they get to their permanent duty station, PT will usually be done on your own, but in the Army, PT is always mandatory. Even the wimpiest MOS (job title) can receive promotion points for excelling on the PT test, so it’s pretty important!

In BCT, many of our husbands are taught how to eat, but some of them don’t retain much of that information! And feeding a high-performance athlete is like fueling up an expensive racecar: You don’t just use any old fuel. So how do we feed our spouses and still maintain a decent food budget AND not have to do a ton of extra work?

Unique Challenges

  1. In order to have enough fuel to perform well as an athlete, a Soldier will be taking in substantially more calories, more fat, and more protein than a sedentary person. If your husband’s activity levels change significantly (for example, if he is injured and not allowed to train for awhile), his diet should also change. You’ll need to adjust portion sizes downward, but you’ll also need to more carefully monitor fat and calorie intake.
  2. A Soldier’s diet will work well for the rest of the family IF the family is physically active, too. If you’re pregnant or breastfeeding, or if you’re feeding a toddler or a teenager, most of this will work fine. But if you’re a sedentary person, eating an athlete’s diet can easily lead to obesity. Unless you’re disabled, get active! It’s the best way to ensure your own health and in the long run it will minimize the amount of work you’ll have to do on meal preparation!
  3. Many athletes (especially those working on bodybuilding, powerlifting, etc.) will require a substantial amount of protein, and this can get expensive. Add more protein through nuts, beans, whole grains, and dairy products. Protein doesn’t just have to be meat.
  4. On the other hand, an athlete NEEDS some animal products if they’re competing at higher levels. We’ll discuss this below. The point is that some of the essential elements of an athlete’s diet cannot be found in plants and cannot be found in a plant-based supplement.

Your Intuition is Wrong

When my oldest son was in first grade (before we started homeschooling), he went through a phase where he would refuse to eat almost everything. He wouldn’t eat meats or cheeses because there was too much fat in them, and he would ask us before every meal if there were any fat or calories in the food we were serving. Some teacher at his school had given his class a lecture on the dangers of fat and calories. Of course, for a little kid, it’s hard to even know what fat and calories ARE! But I had a son who was extremely physically active and in no danger of becoming overweight. Moreover, I seldom serve fast food or heavily processed foods, so even when my family does eat “fat”, it’s usually a healthy fat.

This is where feeding an athlete seems counter-intuitive.

We have all heard a lot of myths that are plain wrong, but when feeding an athlete, these myths can be harmful.

Myth: The best way to lose weight/maintain weight is to diet.
Fact: Dieting doesn’t really do that much to help you lose weight or maintain your weight, not nearly as much as exercise. A single pound of body fat requires about 3,500 calories to burn. Therefore, if you have a calorie deficit of 500 calories per day, it would (theoretically) take you a week to burn a single pound of fat, and if your body doesn’t have adequate fuel, you’re likely to burn muscle as well. The best way to lose body fat (NOT weight, as muscle weighs more than fat) is to increase lean muscle mass. This increases your basal metabolic rate (BMR) which means that you burn more fat even when you’re sedentary. The best way to maintain a healthy weight is to exercise. This doesn’t mean that your weight will perfectly align with those BMI calculators; lean and muscular people often appear “overweight” or even “obese” on those scales. But it does mean that you will have a healthy weight and a lean appearance.

Myth: Eating fatty food makes you fat.
Fact: Dietary fat doesn’t make you fat as long as it is HEALTHY fat. Within our bodies, fat is used for a variety of valuable things. Fat helps us to regulate appetite by giving us a feeling of satiety (fullness). It stores a number of fat-soluble vitamins, including vitamins A, D, E, and K. It is critical for proper neurological functioning; higher-level thinking skills, reaction times, mood, and judgement all suffer when fat intake is insufficient. For an athlete, fat is essential because it helps to lubricate your joints and promotes rapid neurological response, both of which can help to decrease injury in training. Fat seldom needs to be added to the diet, but is prevalent in most sources of protein. (In fact, the extremely low fat content of most vegetarian diets is one of the reasons I don’t recommend them.)

You may have heard about the difference between “good fats” and “bad fats”. The biggest difference is that “good fats” are from natural sources, whereas “bad fats” are often the result of some wholly unnatural man-made process. Trans fats are the result of hydrogenating an oil (usually vegetable oil), usually to extend shelf life or to turn a liquid (vegetable oil) into a solid (shortening). Hydrogenated oils are often used in commercial food products as an attempt to mimic the texture and mouthfeel of butter while using (less expensive!) vegetable oils. Needless to say, there’s really NOTHING good about hydrogenated oils unless you’re preparing for the zombie apocalypse! Saturated fats are generally found in animal products (dairy, meat, etc.) and tropical oils (palm oil, coconut oil, etc.). These oils have a pretty bad reputation – they were the “evil fat” before trans fat hatred became a big deal. The truth is that an active person can derive great benefit from the saturated fats because they’re a highly efficient source of energy and they do help with calcium. For pregnant and breastfeeding women, they’re absolutely essential! Then comes polyunsaturated fats; these include the Omega-3 and Omega-6 that we all hear so much about. These are great fats for brain growth and development, but they’re not found in very high amounts in commercialized Western diets. Omega-3 fatty acids are almost doubled in meat that was grass-fed (not grain-fed, as in a feedlot). Then finally, we get to the monounsaturated fats (MUFAs): These are some of the best fats and should be encouraged! These are found in red meat, milk fat, avocados, olive oil, and nuts (especially fatty nuts like cashews), and because of the way they affect insulin resistance in the body, they are great for helping to maintain (or reach!) a healthy weight.

Myth: Cholesterol is a terrible thing.
Fact: Sometimes. Some people do tend to have high cholesterol, and those people should obviously follow doctor’s orders. But cholesterol is also an essential part of a healthy diet, especially for (are you sensing a theme here yet?) athletes and pregnant or breastfeeding women. In addition to helping insulate nerves (to allow faster communication along the nervous system), cholesterol is absolutely critical for the formation of sex hormones. For a woman of childbearing age who is not pregnant or nursing, cholesterol allows her body to more efficiently form progesterone and estrogen which can help to regulate mood. For an athlete, cholesterol is used to synthesize testosterone, which is essential for helping to build muscle mass. As with fat, cholesterol has its own benefits.

So Now What?

First, talk with your athlete and find out what his goals are. You may want to speak to a nutritionist if there are special dietary needs (diabetes, Celiac’s, etc.) within your family. Some personal trainers have a strong background in sports nutrition and can be useful resources as well. His goal will help you to determine how best to customize his diet.

If he wants to build muscle mass, don’t worry about fat or cholesterol: focus on protein. Protein shakes and protein-filled snacks can help him to take in more protein than he normally would.

If he wants to slim down, focus on lean sources of food and healthy fats. Protein is a key here, but in healthier forms. Protein helps to keep you full which helps you to regulate your appetite better. Sugar should be eliminated or avoided as much as possible if fat loss is the goal; blood sugar fluctuations are some of they biggest causes of food cravings. And while it’s important all the time, make sure to take a multi-vitamin if you’re trying to slim down. Focus on chicken, fish, nuts, and beans (savory, not too sweet).

If he wants to train for something specific, like a specific race or athletic event, work with him to adapt his diet to meet his training needs. Competitions can alter regular dietary schedules.

In any event, try to remember a few things:

  1. Snacks are good as long as they’re healthy snacks. Small frequent meals and mini-meals help to regulate blood sugar and maintain good health.
  2. Spices are always a good idea. Using seasonings and spices can make healthy foods taste great!
  3. Always choose complex carbohydrates over simple sugars whenever you have the choice.
  4. Whenever possible, try to choose foods as close to nature as possible. For example, most conventional cattle are treated with hormones designed to help increase weight gain in cattle; when you eat the beef, those same hormones enter your body. Is it really that far-fetched to think that they might just increase weight gain in humans, too?

With all that in mind, I’ll be back in a couple of days to share some of my favorite portable protein recipes!

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The “Daddy Book”

18 Aug

When Daddy (or Mommy!) is in the military, there will undoubtedly be times when they are away from their little ones. There are a variety of ways that you can help keep the absent parent in your child’s thoughts, and in many cases this can be very comforting to even very young children. One of the things that we use with our toddler is the “Daddy Book”. It’s a relatively sturdy mini-book that he can take everywhere with him, and because they’re so cheaply and easily made, I don’t worry when he finally loves one to death!

First, I use Microsoft Word to design my document. I move margins to “Narrow” and then insert a table. I adjust the table’s cell sizes to 3 x 4 (portrait) and the cell alignment to Middle Center. Then I just use the “Insert Picture” feature to insert pictures of my husband. I can crop the pictures in MS Word if I need to, or I can re-size them (usually to 2.75 x 3.75 or similar). Then, print. You should get two rows and two columns on each page.

You can see that I also printed a cover.

Once that’s done, trim them into rows so that you have two per row.

Then, use a thin layer of rubber cement to affix the rows to other rows. If your printer actually does duplexing without getting them all crooked, you could do it that way, but mine doesn’t!

For the cover, I just wrapped it in clear Contact paper and trimmed around the edges, leaving about 1/8″ from the edge of the paper. Then stack them all together.

Finally, staple. If you have a long-arm stapler (which I don’t!), you could staple them in the middle. Otherwise, you can just do them like I have.

Ta-da! Easy, fast, and a great way to help the kids feel better when Daddy’s away. Gabe asks for his “Daddy Book” before bed, at naptimes, and whenever we get ready to leave the house!

Back to School!

16 Aug

So we started back to homeschooling in earnest this Monday, and the first days have gone well. The kids are doing well with their new curriculum and working much faster than I anticipated.

As part of our study on ancient Rome, we’ve studied Roman art and architecture, examining many of the frescoes and mosaics from the Etruscan period and the early Roman Empire. We did a simple (but fun!) project that I thought I’d share: paper mini-mosaics!

  1. Cut construction paper or that Astrobrights paper into small squares. We cut ours into 1/2-inch squares.
  2. Cut a backing board to the right size. We used corrugated cardboard because we’ve got an abundance of it!
  3. Have your mini artists sketch a basic design idea. Make sure to tell them that it shouldn’t be anything too complicated.
  4. Starting near the center, apply a thin coat of rubber cement to the cardboard in a small area. They’ll need to work fast to get their “tiles” laid out before the rubber cement dries.
  5. The kids apply the “tiles” in a grid pattern and try to make their design in mosaic.
  6. Keep expanding out from the center slowly, doing a small area at a time.
  7. When it’s all done, let dry and then trim/crop excess backing material.
  8. In our case, because I was just using cardboard, I put a layer of clear Contact paper on the cardboard to seal it and protect it. I also added some 3M strips to the back so they could hang it directly onto the wall in their bedrooms.

Quick Update

14 Aug

Has it really been so long since I’ve blogged? Sheesh! Hopefully you’ll all excuse the interruption in my totally irregular but fabulous blogging, as we’ve been settling in to our new home here in San Antonio!

So first, a few updates:

  1. The move went well. Better than expected, to be honest. The movers were wonderful and the travel & move went off with barely a hitch!

    Empty bedrooms!

  2. Okay, I’m WAYYYY too ambitious! I set this huge goal that I wanted to have the house completely unpacked & totally moved in within a week. Well, I kind of knew that wasn’t going to happen, but I figured if I set a high goal, I’d at least be able to make some serious progress. At this point (almost a complete month since we moved in), the only stuff we still have in boxes is garage & storage stuff (which will stay in boxes until we need them), a single box in the nursery, a single box in the hallway closet, a single box in the living room, a couple boxes in the boys’ bedroom, and a single box in the master bedroom (which will probably stay packed until our next move since it contains the kids’ computer and we don’t have a place to set it up in this tiny apartment).
  3. The kids have been settling in nicely. It’s been wonderful to get to see my husband, even though he STILL doesn’t have overnight privileges (not even weekends!). The constant driving back and forth on the weekends makes that time very taxing, but it’s worth it.
  4. It is HOT here. HOT! Making sure everyone stays hydrated has been a challenge; I’ve noticed my blood pressure dropping from dehydration a time or two, and the toddler threw up shortly after we got here from the heat. Hydration management has become a huge priority. We keep ice in the freezer, a water jug in the fridge, and a pitcher of Gatorade in the fridge pretty much all the time. We’ve also got all of the boys their own water bottles which are now required equipment any time we leave the house!
  5. The weather here is unusual and interesting, to say the least! Last Friday there was this strange freak windstorm that blew trees down all over the place. Saturday as I was walking from my apartment office back to my apartment carrying a package we received, I tripped over one of those downed tree branches and had to call my husband on my cell phone to come and rescue me! I thought I had just tweaked my leg a bit, but now it’s a few days later and it’s still severely swollen and painful and I can’t put much weight on it. I’m going to have to see the doctor about it, much to my chagrin (I really don’t much like doctors!).
  6. My c-section has been giving me problems, just like it did with my last baby. I have an appointment with my doctor tomorrow to look at it, so hopefully I’ll get some answers soon.

Next, a few of Holly’s handy dandy tips for apartment living:

  • COMMAND HOOKS! I have these little things all over the house! I use the large hooks for heavier things like heavy picture frames or decorations. The mini hooks are great for things like hanging your keys and hanging lightweight or small items (or decorating!). The medium plastic hooks are what I use to hang up things like aprons, potholders, and brooms in the kitchen. But my favorite kind (that I only discovered this move!) are the small wire hooks. I have these on my kitchen wall and use them to hold all sorts of cooking and serving utensils. It helps to free up valuable drawer space because I don’t have much of it! The advantage to the Command Hooks (and there are also Command picture hangers as well, but I can’t say much about them because I haven’t used them) is that you don’t have to worry about filling in holes when you move out, and you can stick them anywhere – even on cabinet doors and other places that conventional nails might not be appropriate.
  • Storage is always going to be a problem in a small space, and that’s no different when you have a family as large as mine! Few apartments have sufficient storage space, and I like to keep a rather substantial pantry whenever possible. Organizing my pantry spaces is a huge project that I’ll be working on later, so stay tuned to see how I handle that one.
  • Large area rugs are a great way to protect apartment floors. I’ll never for the life of me understand why stupid builders put WHITE or OFF-WHITE carpet wall to wall in three or four bedroom apartments and houses. Most people in 3/4BR rental places have kids, I would think, and any mom knows that white or off-white carpet is about the dumbest thing you can do. Seriously, I hate rental places that do it, but they ALL do it!
  • Take inventory of the new home as soon as you arrive, and when you have children, look for things the kids can (and will!) break, damage, stain, or otherwise mess up. Have them removed. Call the apartment complex and tell them to take them out, or put them into a basement or garage for storage. Take down mini-blinds and put up curtains or something else. The cheap metal mini-blinds in most rental places are absolutely ridiculous; you can bend them just by brushing up against them the wrong way and they cost HUNDREDS of dollars to replace. Look for other things that may be problematic: sliding closet doors (tend to come out of the track if there’s no bottom track), accordion doors (depending on location, they can get easily damaged if you bump into them forgetting that they’re open), and those vertical blinds on a lot of patio doors.

I’m still getting settled in, so I’m not exactly sure when my next post will be, but I’ll try to blog a bit more consistently now that we’re finally moved.

News (July 6th Edition)

5 Jul

Okay, so I don’t blog nearly as regularly as I’d like to. That’s just kind of what happens when you have a family like mine. But I may as well give my dear readers an update on what’s been happening lately in our family:

Little Ian!

I hope my readers can forgive the long break I took about a month ago, but Little Ian was born on June 6th at … I don’t really remember – sometime in the afternoon. In my defense, I was really, REALLY high at the time.

I do remember that he was nine pounds and one ounce. He’s not my biggest one – that distinction goes to Johnny (my VBAC and my ONLY vaginal birth!) who tipped the scales at 9’4″. I remember that they showed him to me in the operating room. Having been used to a hefty two-year-old, the first thing I said was, “He’s so tiny!” The nurse laughed and said, “No, he isn’t!”

I had a scheduled repeat c-section. I have to say that my c-section was GREAT! The anesthesiologist was GREAT! All in all, it was a great experience (for a c-section), even if my husband couldn’t be here for it.

He was very upset that he couldn’t be here for the birth or soon after it, but we’re focusing on moving toward the next adventure very soon.

And speaking of moving…

The Move!

I can’t even express how positively ecstatic I am about the upcoming move! I get to be in the same city as my husband again!!!

The movers will be coming in only 10 days! And we’ll be moving to my husband’s AIT location just a few days later. I’m hoping that the house we applied for will work out and we’ll have housing already lined up by the time we get there. It’s going to be crazy!

But I’m going to take LOTS of pictures, and once I get settled in (and get the computer up and running!), I’ll do a few blog posts on how to maintain your sanity during a move (once I dig my sanity out of whatever box the movers put it in!). So once again, I’ll be off-line for a little while, but I’ll be back soon!

Here’s What I’ve Got in Mind…

Hopefully with the upcoming move, I’ll have LOTS of great stuff to write about! But just to give you all a preview of what’s on the horizon here at TQPH (with the understanding, of course, that I’ll probably get less than half of this actually accomplished), here’s a list of a few projects I’ve got coming up:

  • I have a round dining room tabletop that I want to convert to a chabu-dai table (a low Japanese tea table). I want to get that done before I move.
  • I want to make some zabuton pillows – meditation cushions – for the living room. I’d like to get that done before I move, but I seriously doubt that will happen because I’ll either have to borrow my mother-in-law’s serger or get mine serviced before I can undertake a big project like that.
  • I have this great idea for a couple of paint chip wall art pieces. I’m still tossing around ideas, but I’m planning on something Asian-inspired.
  • I have a few really nice boards in my garage that I want to get cut to size, primed, and painted white before we move so that I can use them as wall shelves with the right brackets.
  • And of course, I’ll be sure to catalog the moving process to share my experiences with my readers.

The Blog

I hope that it’s become clear by now to my readers (both of you!) that I don’t usually do newsy updates. Most of my blog posts are some crafty thing or some homemaking tips or something. Personally, I don’t like blogs that do a bunch of “filler”. I mean, I understand that you’ve got to do some “housekeeping” on a blog. Occasionally you want to do giveaways or something like that, but if I’m watching a blog for homemaking tips, I’m not really thrilled when they spend three days a week doing “Wordless Wednesday” or whatever. And maybe it’s just because I’m cynical and I know exactly what they’re doing when they do that. (For those of you who aren’t bloggers, search engine rankings are largely based on how frequently the blog/website updates. Since almost everybody will run out of material to make a relevant post 5-7 days a week, many professional bloggers will do some sort of “Wordless Wednesday” or “Inspiration for the Weekend” or whatever. It’s a short, totally irrelevant post intended to make it look like the blog is updated frequently.)

Anyway…

I don’t always get my blog updated regularly, mainly because I’m lazy. I could say I’m busy, but I may as well be honest. And I don’t think that most of what I do is really that interesting. After all, do you really want me to write about my two-year-old getting into the markers? You do? Well… They say a picture is worth a thousand words:

Okay, so back to the point: If you want to be updated when I have some new stuff up, please subscribe to my blog. That way you don’t have to keep coming back to obsessively stalk me because you’re craving some new craft projects or cleaning recipes or moving tips; the blog will just send you an innocent little e-mail and let you know that it’s time to come check out something cool! And there’s an added advantage to me: While I can see how many people are visiting my blog, I can’t tell how many of those are robots or some sort of Underworld Internet trolls stumbling across my blog while surfing for porn (you’d be surprised how often seemingly innocent blogs are listed on some sort of weird search page next to porn; it’s weird). Anyway, if you subscribe, then I’ll know that at least SOMEBODY wants me to keep typing!

So now, I’m done. No more boring news (for awhile!). Thanks!

All-Natural Laundry

4 Jul

In my previous post about family skin care,I shared a little bit of my opinion on the issue of separate “non-toxic” stuff for the little people. If you’re spending a boatload of money on some high-end fragrance-free detergent for your little people so you don’t irritate their skin, or if you’re having to use a separate detergent free of optical brighteners for your husband’s military uniforms, you’ve got two problems:

  1. You shouldn’t need artificial fragrances on ANY of your laundry, and it’s not good for ANY family member, and
  2. That’s too much work!

And as I showed you before, it’s not that hard to make non-toxic, non-irritating laundry stuff to keep your clothes looking nice that’s also FRUGAL!

Laundry Detergent

I like to mix up a big batch of this stuff and this is pretty much all I use. Here’s my recipe:

  • 1 bar Castile soap (I like Dr. Bronner’s Lavender for laundry.)
  • 3/4 c. washing soda
  • 3/4 c. borax
  • 1/2 c. Oxi-Clean

Now the Castile soap & Oxi-Clean can be a little pricey, but this is still a pretty cheap recipe. I put the Oxi-Clean into my food processor, add the Castile soap (you may have to cut it in half to get it fed into the machine), then the washing soda & borax. Easy peasy!

Pre-Treating

Let’s start with one very simple thing: There is no pre-treater that will get out EVERYTHING. But any time you spill something or get something on your clothes that is likely to stain, there are a few rules to follow:

  1. Don’t get it hot until the stain is out. If you’re going to use hot water, make SURE it’s okay for the stain. Hot water will set some stains (like blood).
  2. Take it off and treat it immediately. The sooner the better!

Basic Stain Removal

There are hundreds of different types of stains, but most stains fall into one of four main categories: protein, tannin, oil, or dye.
Protein stains include a LOT of common household stains: milk, baby formula, blood, cheese sauce, mud, eggs, pee, poop, vomit, etc. Do NOT use hot water on these! When you think of protein stains, think of raw eggs. If you have raw egg on your countertop and you use really hot water to try to clean it, it will get kind of sticky and thicken up. What’s happened is that the hot water has “cooked” the egg. The same is true with protein stains in your clothing: If you “cook” the proteni, it will be harder to remove.
If a protein stain is new, try rinsing in cold water to get it out. If it’s old or dried, soak it in cold water. You might want to try adding a little detergent to the water to let it soak, depending on how bad the stain is. After treating the stain, wash it in cold water and check it.
Tannin stains include most of your alcohols, coffee, tea, juices (including tomatoes), berries, and so forth. Wash these in HOT water; usually you won’t even need to pre-treat it. But if you’re using a homemade laundry detergent or a detergent that includes a soap, you’ll need to use a pre-treater.
Oil stains can be a pain! Whether it’s automotive grease, butter, lotion, cooking oils, or whatever, oil can be hard to get out. Stains caused by sweat (ring around the collar, underarm stains, etc.) are also oil-based. There are three ways to get oil out, depending on the severity of the stain. The easiest way (which works best for smaller stains or for stains without much color to them) is to use a pre-treater. The slightly harder way is to use dishwashing soap and wash the garment like you would wash your dishes! This tends to work great on most automotive garments.
But if it’s something REALLY intense, you can pull out the big guns (but I caution you that this is NOT natural. Or safe! Be forewarned!). You can use gasoline to remove the stain. The problem is that you’re really not supposed to rinse gas down the drain because it will get into the water supply, and you absolutely MUST rinse & hand-wash the garment perfectly before laundering it. AND you have to launder it separately from everything else and make sure that you can’t smell any gasoline vapors before drying and if you DO smell any vapors you have to wash it again and again until you get it because if you try to dry it without getting all the vapors out, it’ll catch fire. Look – don’t go the gasoline route. Seriously. I know it’s technically an “option”, but it’s an “option” like mastectomy is an “option” to prevent breast cancer. It causes way more problems than it solves. I mention it ONLY because at some point, somebody will recommend it to you. Don’t do it.
Dye stains are the hardest to get rid of – even worse than oils! Cherries & blueberries leave dye stains, as well as grass, ink, paint, magic marker, and drink mixes (like Kool-aid). Pre-treat with a pre-treater, then soak the entire garment in a solution of about 1 tbsp. hydrogen peroxide to 1 c. cold water for 15 minutes, then check to see if the stain is gone. And good luck!

My Pre-Treater (like “Shout”)

Here’s the recipe:
  • 1 c. water
  • 1/2 c. hydrogen peroxide
  • 1/2 c. washing soda

Put into a spray bottle and use like any other pre-treater.

Fabric Softener

You really don’t need fabric softener, you know. But if you DO feel the need for fabric softener, add a little bit of white vinegar to a Downy ball and throw it in the wash. I feel the need to warn you, though, that although this remedy is very popular, it’s not really that useful.

WARNING: Basic chemistry lesson to follow!!!
Distilled water has a neutral pH of 7. Solutions with a pH lower than 7 are acidic and solutions with a pH above 7 are basic. “Hard” water is water with lots of minerals in it, like iron and calcium and magnesium; this water is usually acidic (the acid in the water dissolves metals that it comes into contact with, making it more mineral-rich). “Soft” water tends to be more basic. Incidentally, if your water is very soft or you wash your clothes with a water softener, you will probably want to reduce the washing soda & borax in the above laundry detergent recipe to 1/2 c. each.

When you mix an acid and a base, the resulting compound will have a pH that will be closer to neutral. If you use vinegar and baking soda in the same cleaning product, you’re using water, and water’s much cheaper than vinegar & baking soda.

Washing Soda has a pH of 11 and Borax has a pH of 8.5, whereas vinegar has a pH of 2.4. When you add vinegar to the same wash water that you just added your washing soda & Borax to, you’re neutralizing the water.
Chemistry stuff over!

Smelly Good Spray & Wrinkle Releaser

I do keep a bottle of “smelly good spray” (as my kids call it!) and wrinkle releaser that I use on some of my garments. I do NOT use it baby clothes, but they don’t need it.

  • 1 c. water
  • 1/4 c. white vinegar
  • 1/2 c. alcohol (either rubbing alcohol or clear unflavored vodka)
  • 15-20 drops lavender essential oil (go by smell)

You use it like you would use Febreeze or Downy Wrinkle Releaser, but check it on your fabric in an inconspicuous place before using it because you want to make sure that it won’t damage your fabric. Usually it hasn’t been a problem for me, but it’s better safe than sorry!

Whole-Family Skin Care

2 Jul

For many families, babies get all the good stuff! In a lot of households, babies get special shampoo, special lotion, special laundry detergent, etc. For many of us, we just accept that babies and younglings get the toxin-free, super healthy stuff while the grown-ups get the commercial stuff.

It doesn’t have to be this way!

Babies and toddlers may have a reaction to many chemicals found in commercial skin care products, but that’s only because their virgin skin hasn’t yet developed an immunity or a resistance to the vast array of chemical concoctions we use daily. It does NOT mean that adults should be using these products – just that most adults have adapted to them.

But ideally, shouldn’t we all be non-toxic?

And as parents, think on this: Your toddlers are still in your arms all the time! If you use a detergent that your child is sensitive to on YOUR clothes and save the “good stuff” for their clothes, they’re still going to get exposure to the toxins every time you pick them up. For parents (especially mothers!) of infants, it’s even more important, because these little ones are constantly mouthing on parents. Infants are “tasting” Mom’s skin every time they nurse or she lets them suck on a finger.

For some of us, we may cite cost as a factor, but I have great news! Homemade skin care products can be made in minutes and cost less than virtually every commercial product on the market! Here’s a few of the recipes that I use:

Shampoo/Liquid Soap

Admittedly, this one can be rather expensive, depending on where you purchase your Castile soap. But we use this soap as shampoo, hand soap, face soap, body wash – you name it. First, here’s what I love about this soap:

  • It’s mildly acidic, so it will de-tangle hair. (I do advise that you wait to brush/comb your hair until it’s dry to prevent breakage, and if you have exceptionally thick hair like I do, you may need to comb it in sections the first time after the shower, but I have to do that no matter what shampoo & conditioner I use!)
  • It rinses clean in only one rinse. This is GREAT for those reluctant little bathers who do NOT like having their hair rinsed!
  • It’s mildly anti-bacterial; this can greatly help to reduce body odor as most of that is caused by bacteria.
  • It’s heavily anti-fungal, which is great for preventing yeast infections.

Now for my own testimonial: I have had flaky scalp for about eight years now. Beauticians always recommended some super-hydrating shampoo and it did nothing. Some time ago, the flaking scalp spread to my face – especially my eyebrows, T-zone, and nose. Nothing worked on it – no beauty product, INCLUDING the very expensive department store cosmetics in the pale green package! At times, it would get so bad that my scalp and face would start bleeding! When I started using this shampoo, my flaky scalp went away almost immediately, so I started using it on my face. With no other moisturizer (except a natural sunscreen when I go out during the day), everything cleared up. No more flaky skin. No more acne. Just clear and beautiful skin. I absolutely LOOOOOVE this shampoo!

So without further adieu, the recipe:

  • 1 c. liquid Castile soap (I use Dr. Bronner’s Almond soap.)
  • 3 tbsp. apple cider vinegar
  • 1/2 tsp. tea tree oil
  • 1/4 c. water

Mix and then store in an old shampoo bottle. I like to use a bottle left over from a foaming shampoo because it makes it really sudsy and fun!

Deodorant

Okay, so the special shampoo will go a long way toward making you smell nice, but sometimes you need a little extra. That’s when I turn to my all-natural deodorant. Now this has kind of been an experiment. I tried putting it into some old deodorant containers and it did NOT work. At ALL! So I just stuck it into a small Pyrex dish with a lid and called it a day. I apply it by rubbing it on with my fingers like lotion. It gets very hard but softens with body heat.

One note: Do NOT keep this in your bathroom while you’re showering. The heat in the room will cause it to melt. If you do it by accident, it’s okay – just put it some place cool and it’ll harden back up again.

I don’t have exact measurements for this because I just kind of eyeballed it.

  • Coconut oil
  • Baking soda
  • Cornstarch
  • Tea Tree Oil
  • Lavender Oil (for girls!)

Mix the coconut oil (about 1/2 c. or so) with about 3 drops Tea Tree Oil & 7 drops Lavender Oil (for girls!). For boys you can either use 3 drops Tea Tree Oil & 5 drops Eucalyptus Oil, OR for a more neutral deodorant (for boys AND girls), you can just do about 7 drops Tea Tree Oil. Anyways, mix it up! Then add equal parts of baking soda and cornstarch until you get kind of a thick paste. Store it in a covered container and you’re good to go!

Hair Masque

Now this is just for Mom. Maybe Dad if he’s got long, flowing locks. Anyways, about once every 1-2 weeks (when my hair gets a little overworked), I mash up 1 avocado, 1 banana, and 1/4 c. honey in a blender until it’s smooth. Rub it into the hair and scalp. Cover and let sit for 30 minutes, then rinse out. It makes your hair SUPER soft. To be honest, I often feel like my hair is a little TOO soft, and so I’ll shampoo it a couple of times after using it just to get it to feel a little more “normal”, but that’s a matter of personal preference.

Facial Mask

Another easy blender one. Grind up about 1 c. oats in a blender on low until still kind of coarse. Add in about 1/4 c. honey and 1/2 c. yogurt to make a thick paste (you can either do it in the blender or with a spoon). Apply and let dry (about 15 minutes or so), then wash off.

Everything Else!

Coconut Oil!

I use coconut oil as a baby lotion, a massage oil, a body lotion, a facial moisturizer, and a gentle sunscreen. I’m sure you can use it for more stuff, but it works great!

Secret Stuff for the Moms

Okay, so this is the stuff that’s NOT for the men-folk to know about! But while I’m sharing, I have a somewhat gross but highly effective aphrodisiac oil recipe that I may as well share.

It starts with an essential oil blend:

  • 5 drops Jasmine (You’ll probably need to use an Absolute because Jasmine EOs are hard to find.)
  • 3 drops Vanilla
  • 10 drops Ylang-Ylang
  • 1 drop Neroli

Now here’s the kind of gross part, but it WORKS! If you’re one of those gals who charts her fertility (and if you’re not, you should be!), wait until ovulation. Now during ovulation, you should be able to collect a little bit of cervical mucus – it’s that thick egg-white stuff that you get when you wipe after you pee. So when that happens, just take the mucus (try to get as much as you can) and add it to your oil blend.

Store in an opaque container. You’ll usually only need a few drops, or you can put some into a carrier oil. Make sure it gets some place where he’ll “smell” it. Now he won’t necessarily “smell” it – it’s actually got a very light scent – but when it hits his nostrils, the essential oils and pheremones will work to trigger a strong sensual desire. So you can put it into an oil diffuser, mix it into a massage oil and give him a massage, etc. – whatever you need to do to get it into his nostrils.

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